Education

CARDIOVASCULAR Webinars

Edition 2019 – The ESCR Educational Webinars are back in a new format!

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Different levels (Advanced/Basic)

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Starting time 18:00 CET

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2 speakers per webinar

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Interactive lectures

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Time for questions

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In cooperation with the ESCR Young Club

ABOUT THE WEBINARS

Description

The online lectures are held in English language and on set dates and time. The duration of each session is approximately 60 minutes. Two presenters and one moderator will be present during the session. Attendees will have the opportunity to ask questions.

Participation

The ESCR Educational Webinars are free of charge and open for every active ESCR member.
Webinar places are limited and will be offered on a first-come, first-served basis. Early registration is recommended

Coordinators

C. Loewe, Vienna/AT
M. Francone, Rome/IT 
ESCR Office

For active ESCR members in good standing the recordings of the past Educational Webinars are available in the MyUserArea!

ESCR Webinar 01 – Level Advanced

Webinars 2019

ESCR Webinar 01 – Level Advanced
Date: Wednesday, January 16, 2019, at 18:00 CET
Title: “Optimize your cardiac MR: How to avoid common problems/mistakes“
Moderator: Prof. Luigi Natale (Rome/IT)

"Setting up a CMR examination: standard workflow & sequences revisited"

Prof. Francesco Santini, Basel/CH

"How to avoid artifacts and pitfalls"

Prof. Ursula Reiter, Graz/AT

Lecture 1 - details

Description

Cardiac MRI examinations are usually time consuming, requiring a lot of expert intervention from the MR technician to properly plan and execute. While MR manufacturers and individual radiology departments continuously optimize the workflow, there are some aspects that could be potentially overlooked in a clinical setting. This presentation will focus on the following questions:

• Are we scanning the right patients? Proper screening of patients, especially with implanted active devices, is essential in the optimization of the scanning workflow.
• Are we using the right sequences? The most common sequences (bSSFP, STIR) might not be ideal in some cases.
• What does the future hold? Methods that will soon be available to optimize a cardiac MRI scan.

Learning Objectives

• Dealing with implanted active devices
• Alternative acquisition methods for common sequences
• Accelerated cardiac imaging

About the speaker

Dr. Santini studied Electronic Engineering with a specialization in Biomedical Engineering at the Università degli Studi di Firenze (Italy). He then moved to Basel and in 2009 gained a PhD degree in Biophysics (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) in the Radiology Department (University of Basel). He then continued as a postdoctoral fellow and since 2013 Dr. Santini is responsible for MR Safety in the University Hospital in Basel. In 2015 he was among the first people to obtain the title of MR Safety Expert from the American Board of MR Safety, and helped draft the Swiss guidelines for MR Safety endorsed by the Swiss Society of Radiology. His research activities are in  the field of dynamic and quantitative MR imaging, applied to the cardiovascular and musculoskeletal systems.

Dr. Santini is the author of more than 40 scientific publications and recipient of various research grants.

Lecture 2 - details

Description

CMR imaging represents the established reference standard method to quantify volumetric function, myocardial mass, shunts and regurgitation volumes, as well as myocardial fibrosis non-invasively. The fast and frequently irregular motion of the heart, however, renders CMR especially prone to imaging artefacts, which might not only lead to limited or undiagnostic image quality but – if not recognized – incorrect image interpretation and/or quantification of assessed parameters. The lecture aims to discuss strategies to identify and avoid CMR imaging artefacts potentially causing pitfalls.

Learning Objectives

• Artefacts and pitfalls in CMR volumetric function and blood flow
• Artefacts and pitfalls in morphological CMR imaging
• Artefacts and pitfalls in relaxation time mapping

About the speaker

Ursula Reiter received her diploma in Physics at the University of Technology Graz in 1993. During her PhD studies in the field of experimental and molecular laser physics she worked as university assistant at the University of Technology Graz. In 1998 he graduated from the University of Technology in Graz with distinction. In 1999 she started to work at the Department of Radiology, Medical University of Graz. Since 2001 her professional and research focus lies on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and post-processing. She is author and co-author of numerous scientific papers, book contributions, books and patents. Ursula Reiter received her habilitation in Experimental and Theoretical Radiology at the Medical University of Graz in 2017.

ESCR Webinar 01 – Level Basic

Webinars 2019

ESCR Webinar 01 – Level Basic
Date: Wednesday, February 13, 2019, at 18:00 CET
Title: “Optimize your cardiac MR: Cardiac MR optimization in daily clinical routine“
Young Club Moderator: Dr. Marco Gatti, Turin/IT

„My late enhancement does not work“: clinical examples, explanations and solutions

Prof. Matthias Gutberlet, Leipzig/DE

„My flow measurements are not correct“: clinical examples, explanations and solutions

Dr. Nicola Galea, Rome/IT

Lecture 1 - details

Description

Late Gadolinium Enhancement (LGE) sequences are one of the most frequently used sequences in Cardiac MR (CMR). Typical LGE patterns have been described, which may help in the differential diagnosis of Cardiac Diseases, especially in cardiomyopathies. But this knowledge only helps, if these techniques can be adequately used. Artefacts may mimic or mask disease. Therefore, adequate precautions against artefacts and misinterpretations have to be considered.

Learning Objectives

• To learn about the most important LGE patterns in CMR
• To learn how to avoid artefacts or misinterpretation of LGE
• To gather experience in using sequence solutions

Teaser Case

About the speaker

Family Name: GUTBERLET, Matthias
Title: MD, PhD, EBCR, Prof. Dr. med.
Present Position: Specialist in Radiology; Specialist in Nuclear Medicine.
Head of the Department for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology
Office Phone No.: +49-341-865-1702 Office Fax No.: +49-341-865-1803
e-mail: matthias.gutberlet@helios-kliniken.de
Office Address: Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology
University Leipzig / Leipzig Heart Center
Strümpellstrasse 39
04289 Leipzig
GERMANY

Medical Graduation and Other Professional Training:
1985-1992 Philipps-University Marburg Medical School
1993 Doctor thesis in Orthopedics at Philipps-University Marburg
1992 – 1995 Residency in Cardiology (Prof. Fleck) German Heart Institute Berlin (DHZB)
1995 – 2000 Research fellowship and specialist training in Diagnostic Radiology,
Charité Berlin (Prof. Felix)
27/06/2000 End of specialist training in Radiology
(Facharztausbildung in „Diagnostischer Radiologie“)
04/00-04/02 Research fellowship in Nuclear Medicine (Prof. Eichstädt), Charité, Berlin
11/02 „Habilitation“ in Diagnostic Radiology (Assistant Professor of Radiology)
12/2003 End of specialist training in Nuclear Medicine
(Facharztausbildung in „Nuklearmedizin“)
7/2002 Senior Consultant in Diagnostic Radiology (CT/MRI/conventional radiology)
Since 16.08.07 Head of the Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology
University Leipzig / Leipzig Heart Center and
Professorship for Cardiovascular Imaging at the University of Leipzig

Research:
I was mainly involved in research projects dealing with Doppler-ultrasound, contrast agents, MDCT and MRI of the cardiovascular system, using the techniques of Dynamic CTA, Dual Energy, Iterative reconstruction, Coronary CTA, MR-angiography, MR-volumetry, MR flow-measurements and MR-perfusion in humans and animal models. I am one of the project leaders of the German Competence Network for Congenital Heart Disease since 2003.

Recent studies of our group were dealing with Dose Reduction in Coronary CTA, Imaging and Post-Processing before and after TAVI and EVAR, MR viability assessment in comparison to SPECT, PET, Cardiac MRI at 3.0T and studies on the assessment of myocarditis and other cardiomyopathies by MRI. Furthermore, we have gathered the first experiences in Cardiac PET/MR and MRI guided electrophysiology studies as well as the first atrial flutter ablation in man by using passive and active catheter tracking.

Selected Activities in Radiological Societies:
– President of the European Society of Cardiac Radiology (ESCR) 2014-2017
– President of the Working Group of Cardiovascular Imaging of the German Röntgen Society (DRG) since 5/2014
– Congress President of the 10th Scientific Meeting of the European Society of Cardiac Radiology (ESCR) 2009 in Leipzig from October 8th-10th
– Member of the European Board of Cardiac Radiology (EBCR) since 2011
– Q3-Adviser Cardiac CT and Cardiac MR of German Roentgen Society (DRG) since 2011

Number of Peer Reviewed Publications as indexed in PubMed: > 220

 

Lecture 2 - details

Description

Flow measurements by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging are required for the quantitative characterization of a large number of congenital and valvular diseases and in some cases play a pivotal role in the clinical decision-making process.
Phase-contrast MR sequences are widely available on the common MR scanners, easily executable and and quickly assessable; however, their acquisition and analysis can be the subject of multiple errors.
An accurate assessment of regurgitant or shunt flow may have a tremendous impact on clinical management and surgery indication and therefore a adequate knowledge of common pitfalls and technique limitations it is essential to provide reliable measurements and avoid altered estimates.

Learning Objectives

This presentation will focus on the following questions:
• How to acquire the appropriate phase contrast sequence (Velocity encoding value, plane orientation) for flow assessment?
• How to prevent the most common errors in acquisition or assessment?
• How to verify that our measurements are reliable?
• In what clinical conditions does an accurate flow measurement have impact in patient management?

Teaser Case

About the speaker

Dr. Nicola Galea, MD PhD, is a 36-years-old man, board radiologist dedicated to cardiac imaging (CT and MRI). He graduated in Medicine and Surgery in 2006, he completed his radiology residency program in 2011 and he obtained PhD diploma in Cardiovascular Imaging in 2015, at the “Sapienza” University of Rome. Visiting fellowship in 2011 at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City (NY).

From 2017 he is a Temporary Researcher in Radiology at the Department of Experimental Medicine of the “Sapienza” University of Rome.

Since 2007, his professional and research activities lies on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging with special focus on: inflammatory, ischemic and metabolic myocardial diseases; 4D flow magnetic resonance imaging of aorta after surgery; developing novel algorithms for the MR images analysis (perfusion, parametric mapping, ECV extraction); clinical-pathological-genetic-radiological correlations in familiar cardiomyopathies and congenital heart diseases.
He is author and co-author of more than 40 scientific papers and book chapters and recipient of various research grants.
From 2017 he is Secretary of Italian College of Cardiac Imaging endorsed by Italian Society of Radiology (SIRM).
European Board of Cardiac Radiology (EBCR) Diploma endorsed by ESCR in 2014.
He is full member of European Society of Cardiovascular Radiology (ESCR) from 2011 and attends the ESCR annual conference from 2007.

ESCR Webinar 02 – Level Advanced

Webinars 2019

ESCR Webinar 02 – Level Advanced
Date: Wednesday, March 13, 2019, at 18:00 CET
Title: “Modern techniques for Cardiac CT: Anatomy or function or both?“
Moderator: Dr. Maja Hrabak-Paar (Zagreb/HR)

"Assessment of coronary stenosis and FFR"

Dr. Carlo de Cecco, Atlanta/US

"CT perfusion"

Prof. Rozemarijn Vliegenthart, Groningen/NL

Lecture 1 - details

Description

The lecture will be focused on the actual state of the art in cardiac CT and the technical solutions available in clinical practice to obtain functional information on the coronary fractional flow reserve and myocardial perfusion.

Learning Objectives

• To describe the actual state of the art in cardiac CT
• To illustrate functional imaging techniques in cardiac CT
• To provide actual clinical results and application using CT myocardial Perfusion and CT Fractional Flow reserve

Teaser


Patient with decreased fractional flow reserve in the left anterior descending artery (LAD) and matching myocardial hypoperfusionin the LAD territory.

About the speaker

Carlo N. De Cecco, MD, PhD is an Associate Professor of Radiology and Biomedical Informatics at Emory University in Atlanta. He is board certified from the American College of Radiology and the American College of Nuclear Medicine. His main scientific interest is cardiothoracic imaging and AI/ML applications. He has authored more than 180 articles in peer-reviewed scientific journals, eleven book chapters, and two books. He is on the editorial board of Radiology: Cardiothoracic Imaging and Investigative Radiology, associate editor for the Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, and he serves as the Artificial Intelligence/Machine Learning section editor for the European Journal for Radiology. He is a member of numerous scientific societies, and serves as Chair of the Cardiac Radiology Use Case Panel at the Data Science Institute (DSI) – American College of Radiology (ACR). He is a Fellow of the SCCT, NASCI, SCBTMR and ESGAR. Since 2014, he is a member of the Board of Experts of the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research.

Lecture 2 - details

Description

Many CTA-derived coronary stenoses do not cause ischemia. To determine the hemodynamic significance of a stenosis, the “downstream” blood supply is evaluated in myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) techniques. Cardiac CT allows for anatomical and functional evaluation of coronary artery disease in one examination by adding CTMPI. There are two main CTMPI techniques to image myocardial ischemia, namely static and dynamic imaging. Dynamic CTMPI enables the quantification of myocardial blood flow, which may have particular advantages in f.e. multivessel disease. In recent years, numerous studies have shown the diagnostic accuracy of CT for assessment of myocardial ischemia, and the improvement of specificity for hemodynamically significant CAD compared to CTA alone. The lecture will include discussion of the current clinical status of CTMPI.

Learning Objectives

• To understand the potential value of CT perfusion
• To appreciate CT perfusion techniques
• To learn about the current clinical status of CT perfusion

Teaser


CT perfusion transverse image, ischemia in LAD territory

About the speaker

Rozemarijn Vliegenthart studied medicine at the Erasmus University Rotterdam and the University of Groningen and obtained her MD degree (cum laude) in 2005. She obtained her PhD degree in 2003, and holds an MSc degree in Clinical Epidemiology. Vliegenthart works as a radiologist at the University Medical Center of Groningen. Research interests include validation and application of new techniques in cardiothoracic CT/MRI, centered on coronary artery disease, lung cancer and COPD. She has acquired a number of grants in cardiothoracic imaging as (co-)applicant. Vliegenthart is (co-)author on >180 scientific publications (H factor 37). She serves as Chairman of the cardiovascular section of the Dutch Radiology Society and as Secretary of the ESCR. Vliegenthart is Tenure track professor at the University of Groningen.

ESCR Webinar 02 – Level Basic

Webinars 2019

ESCR Webinar 02 – Level Basic
Date: Wednesday, April 10, 2019, at 18:00 CET
Title: “Modern techniques for Cardiac CT: Case based assessment of coronary artery disease“
Moderator: Dr. Giulia Benedetti, London/UK (Young Club Member)

"Assessment of stable coronary artery disease"

Prof. Gorka Bastarrika, Pamplona/ES

"CT in acute chest pain"

Prof. Christian Loewe, Vienna/AT

Lecture 1 - details

Description

Coronary CT angiography (CCTA) has emerged as the imaging modality of choice to non-invasively assess the coronary vasculature. In the clinical scenario of patients with stable clinical symptoms, CCTA is recommended in patients with low to intermediate pre-test probability of coronary artery disease and in particular, in those with non-diagnostic stress electrocardiogram or stress imaging. This decision is mainly based on the high negative predictive value of the technique. New developments, such as CT-derived fractional flow reserve (FFR-CT) estimation and myocardial CT perfusion imaging have shown to provide incremental diagnostic value.

Learning Objectives

• To review the clinical indications for CCTA in patients with stable coronary artery disease.
• To understand the need to assess the functional significance of coronary stenosis, beyond the morphologic assessment of the vasculature.
• To become familiar with most recent diagnostic approaches to coronary artery disease, including FFR-CT and myocardial CT perfusion

Teaser Case

About the speaker

Name: Dr. Gorka Bastarrika, MD, PhD, EBCR
Specialty: Radiologist. Board certified cardiothoracic radiologist (European Board of Cardiac Radiology Diploma endorsed by the European Society of Radiology, ESR)
Current position: Head of the Department of Radiology. Clínica Universidad de Navarra. Pamplona, Spain.
Institution: Clínica Universidad de Navarra. Pamplona, Spain.
Years of experience: 15 years of experience in cardiothoracic imaging, particularly in cardiac CT and cardiac MRI.

Publications in peer-reviewed journals: 154.
Editor, co-editor, chapters in books: 16.
Invited lectures: 163.
Scientific contribution to national and international congresses: 265

Member of:
• Spanish Society of Radiology (SERAM), 15/10/1999-
• Spanish Society of Cardiothoracic Imaging (SEICAT), 2008-
• European Society of Radiology (ESR), 2008-
• European Society of Cardiovascular Radiology (ESCR), 2011-

Other merits:
• Past president of the Spanish Society of Cardiothoracic Imaging (SEICAT),
• Member of ESCR Communication & New Media Committee: October 2017 until October 2020
• Member of the ESCR Membership & Registry Committee: October 2017 until October 2020Member of the Scientific Programme Committee (ESCR), 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014.
• Member of the Scientific Programme Committee (ECR), subcommittee cardiac imaging 2012, 2013, 2014, 2018
• Scientific exhibition jury. ECR 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
• EPOS reviewer: 2013-19

Lecture 2 - details

Description

Three potentially life-threatening disorders can become clinically evident by the unspecific symptom of “acute chest pain”, and in two out of them including pulmonary embolism and acute aortic syndrome CT angiography was established as the first diagnostic modality of choice. Given the high evidence for the value of Cardiac CT in ruling out relevant coronary artery disease in stable patients and facing still existing challenges to safely triage patients in chest pain units, the possible role of Cardiac CT in this clinical scenario is under evaluation and discussion. It is proven that CT can be used to safely rule out acute coronary syndromes with a very high negative predictive value and that CT can help to early discharge patients from the chest pain unit. However, the possible role in the positive diagnosis of an acute coronary syndrome is not as clear.

The aim of this part of the webinar is to provide an overview about the clinical challenges combined with the diagnosis and further management of patients suffering from acute chest pain. Furthermore, the most important differential diagnosis will be addressed with the most relevant imaging findings in the acute setting. The main focus of the presentation, however, will be on the existing challenges and possible solutions of using Cardiac CT in patients with acute coronary syndromes, exemplified with clinical cases.

Learning Objectives

• To become familiar with the clinical challenges of patients with acute chest pain
• To learn about the role of Cardiac CT in the management of patients with acute coronary syndrome
• To discuss the possible future role of Cardiac CT in the management of patients suffering from acute chest pain

 

Teaser

 

About the speaker

Univ.-Prof. Dr. Christian Loewe, EBCR, was born 1971 in Vienna, Austria.

He is currently the Chairman of the Division of Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology, Department of Bioimaging and Inage-Guided Intervention at the Medical University of Vienna. He serves currently as the Chairman of the European Board of Cardiovascular Radiology (EBCR) and as the Chairmen of the Educational Committee within the European Society of Cardiovascular Radiology (ESCR).

He was President of the Annual Meeting of ESCR in Vienna 2014 and Chariman of the Postgraduate educational programme planning committee of ECR 2019. Christian Loewe was member of the Editorial Board of European Radiology (2002 – 2011) and Associate Editor of Radiology ((2011 – 2017).

The main focus of his clinical and scientific work non-invasive cardiovascular diagnostic (MSCT and MRT of the heart; CT angiography; MR angiography), he gave more than 350 invited lectures, has authored / co-authored more than 110 articles in peer-reviewed journals and is the author of 5 book chapters.

ESCR Webinar 03 – Level Advanced

Webinars 2019

ESCR Webinar 03 – Level Advanced
Date: Wednesday, May 15, 2019, at 18:00 CET
Title: “Modern techniques in Cardiac MR: The fourth and fifth dimension in cardiac MR“
Moderator: Prof. Matthias Gutberlet (Leipzig/DE)

"4D flow imaging in Cardiac imaging"

Prof. Elie Mousseaux, Paris/FR

"T1 mapping: how, when and why?"

Prof. Jens Bremerich, Basel/CH

Lecture 1 - details

Description

The basic principles of MRI velocity measurements will be explained, for the 2D method (Vz through the plane) and for the 4D flow (the 3 velocity components through time). The recognized indications of 2D velocity measurements will be given and illustrated (quantification of regurgitation and valve stenosis, shunts, etc.). For each application, the current results of the 4D flow will be also analyzed. Finally, the challenges and prospects of this method, which is currently being validated, will also be explained for the evaluation of new prognostic indices in pulmonary arterial hypertension or heart failure.

Learning Objectives

• Understand the basic principles of MRI velocity measurements and the differences with echo Doppler.
• Understand the importance of velocity and flow measurements in cardiac explorations through practical examples, as part of current recommendations
• Analysis of the potential of 4D flow in this field, which could lead to a very rapid change in the management and prognostic analysis of many cardiovascular diseases

 

Teaser

Question 1 : Diagnosis ??
Question 2 : Why is there a low maximal velocity through the stenosis ??

About the speaker

NAME: Mousseaux
FIRST NAME: Elie

ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8076-1445
61 years, Professor in Radiology since 2001
• Certified in both Cardiology and Radiology.
• 29 years of clinical experience in Cardiovascular Radiology using CT, MRI and conventional angiography, cardiac angiography and catheterization. He can claim to have personally done more than 10,000 cardiac CT and more than 10,000 Cardiac MR and supervised more than double those numbers as a team leader in charge of this work in his institution.
• 179 Publications with Medline Citations mainly related to both cardiac CT and cardiac MR; 300 International Presentations.
• 120 Invited talks in International meetings.
• 22 years of research experience with expertise in evaluating and developing new CT and MRI applications for cardiac and vascular imaging.

Lecture 2 - details

Description

Late Gadolinium opened the door towards qualitative tissue characterisation two decades ago. Today we whitness the next evolutionary step of cardiac MRI: Qualitative tissue characterisation by means of mapping techniques. This lecture shall describe motivation, technique and clinical application of T1-mapping.

Learning Objectives

• To understand motivation for T1-mapping
• To review different techniques for T1-mapping
• To discuss clinical applications of T1-mapping.

Teaser


Short chamber views of a patient with acute subepicardial myocarditis in the inferolateral wall with prolongation of native T1 and T2 as well as shortening of T1 after Gadolinium injection.

About the speaker

Jens Bremerich, MD MHBA is Professor of Radiology and section head of Cardiothoracic Imaging at University Hospital Basel, Switzerland. He attended medical school in Montpellier (F), Edinburgh (GB), Indianapolis (USA) and Heidelberg (D) where he received his MD in 1991. Following 12 months as a cardiology resident at Heidelberg, he trained in Nuclear Medicine and Radiology at Basel University Hospital. Moreover, he researched cardiac MRI at the University of California in San Francisco during a two year research fellowship with Dr. Charles B. Higgins. He explored distribution and magnetic effects of various contrast agents in myocardial and capillary injury.
Currently Dr. Bremerich is president of the European Society of Cardiovascular Radiology and he presides the cardiac imaging working group in Switzerland. Dr. Bremerich is a strong advocate of a fruitful cooperation between Radiology, Nuclear Medicine, Cardiology and MR Physics as it is realised at Basel University Hospital.

ESCR Webinar 03 – Level Basic

Webinars 2019

ESCR Webinar 03 – Level Basic
Date: Wednesday, June 12, 2019, at 18:00 CET
Title: “Modern techniques in Cardiac MR: Case based functional cardiac MR“
Moderator: Dr. Giuseppe Muscogiuri, Milan/IT (Young Club Member)

"Myocardial characterization, how I do it"

Dr. Charles Peebles, Southampton/UK

"Assessment of grown-ups with congenital heart diseases (GUCH)"

Dr. Ricardo Budde, Rotterdam/NL

Lecture 1 - details

Description

It is fundamental that CMR practitioners understand the techniques available to identify myocardial characteristics such as fat, oedema and fibrosis, and know how to interpret them. Standard T1 and T2 weighted black blood sequences have been the mainstay of tissue characterisation but have potential limitations for cardiac use. Late gadolinium enhanced sequences were introduce as a powerful tool to identify myocardial scar, initially in ischaemic heart disease, but subsequently its utility in many disease processes has become clear both for diagnosis and prognosis. First pass perfusion imaging and early gadolinium enhancement add the ability to demonstrate myocardial oedema, and microvascular obstruction. Finally tissue mapping sequences can provide a quantifiable assessment of tissue characteristics before and after contrast. This lecture will focus on clinical cases to explore the use and interpretation of these techniques.

Learning Objectives

Utility and application of T1 and T2 weighted black blood sequences
• The role of late gadolinium enhancement in identifying myocardial scar/fibrosis
• The techniques available to demonstrate myocardial oedema

Teaser Case

About the speaker

Dr Charles Peebles is a Consultant Radiologist at the University Hospital Southampton with a specialist interest in Cardiothoracic imaging. He has a specific expertise in cardiac cross sectional imaging and is lead of the Department of Cardiothoracic Radiology at Southampton. He has been performing CMR since 1995 and Cardiac CT since 1999.

Charles has previously been the President of the British Society of Cardiovascular Imaging, and has been a board member of the British Society of Cardiovascular MRI. He currently serves on the Executive committee of the European Society of Cardiac Radiology. He has recently been on the NICE guideline committee for Acute chest pain and previously sat on the guideline development group for the management of stable angina.

Lecture 2 - details

Description

All cardiovascular radiologists will encounter adult patients with congenital heart defects in their daily clinical practice. Improved screening in the prenatal period and early infancy and improved outcomes of surgical treatment resulted in many patients to reach adulthood. Moreover, several congenital heart defects may cause no or limited non-specific symptoms and are first diagnosed when the patient is already an adult. Often, they may be an additional finding during imaging for other reasons. Imaging is an integral part of the diagnosis, treatment planning and timing as well as routine follow-up in all grown-ups with congenital heart disease (GUCH). In this webinar the basics of MRI imaging in GUCH with regard to anatomy, image acquisition, post processing and interpretation are discussed.

Learning Objectives

• To recognize the most common congenital heart defects in adults
• Know the MRI image acquisitions needed to evaluate patient with GUCH
• Become familiar with the most important imaging findings needed for patient management decisions

Teaser


35-year-old patient who suffered a stroke.

Can you spot the abnormalities on this MRI of the heart and explain how they relate to the patient suffering a stroke?

About the speaker

Ricardo Budde, MD, PhD, EBCR, FSCCT
Ricardo Budde is a staff radiologist and clinical section chief for cardiovascular radiology at Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
He obtained his MD, PhD and an MSc in Medical Biology from Utrecht University. Training as a Radiologist was completed in 2013 followed by a fellowship in cardiovascular radiology. Ricardo passed the European Diploma in Cardiac Imaging examination in 2014.
Erasmus MC is the largest academic center in the Netherlands with a very busy cardiovascular imaging section covering every aspect of CT and CMR imaging.
Ricardo has (co)-authored over 145 peer-reviewed publications and serves as daily supervisor for multiple PhD students. His main research interests include imaging of (prosthetic) heart valves, aortic disease, endocarditis, imaging to optimize cardiac interventions and dose reduction techniques for CT. The Dutch Heart Foundation has awarded him two large grants as PI including a prestigious Dekker grant. Ricardo is an active member of the European Society of Cardiovascular Radiology as well as Fellow of the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography.
Furthermore, he is course director of the successful Hands-on Cardiac CT course: www.cardiovascularimaging.nl

ESCR Webinar 04 – Level Advanced

Webinars 2019

ESCR Webinar 04 – Level Advanced
Date: Wednesday, September 18, 2019, at 18:00 CET
Title: “CT and MR in valvular heart disease: Advanced Imaging Techniques (beyond Echo…)“
Moderator: Dr. Rodrigo Salgado, Antwerp/BE

"CT before minimal invasive valvular repair"

Dr. Tilman Emrich, Mainz/DE

"Maybe MR in valvular heart disease: when echocardiography is not enough"

Dr. Alexandros Kallifatidis, Thessaloniki/GR

Lecture 1 - details

Description

The role of transcatheter valve repair has emerged over the last decade. While surgery is performed under direct sight of the dysfunctional valve, catheter-based interventions do need periprocedural imaging as a key step for treatment planning. Computed tomography CT) – beside echocardiography – has proven to be a highly useful imaging method for treatment planning because of high temporal and isotropic spatial resolution. Beside established treatment of aortic valve disease, modern strategies allow the replacement or even reconstruction of atrioventricular valves.

Learning Objectives

To explain the role of CT in periprocedural imaging in minimal invasive valvular repair
• To learn about favourable CT image acquisition protocols and post-processing techniques for treatment planning
• To discuss future developments of periprocedural imaging for minimal invasive valvular repair

About the speaker

Tilman Emrich is a junior consultant specialized in cardiovascular imaging at the University Medical Center Mainz, Germany. After residency, he earned his board certification in diagnostic radiology in 2015, followed by certifications for cardiac imaging (CT and MR) in 2017.
His research focuses on multiparametric cardiac imaging in a general population and disease cohorts, the use of cardiac MRI in acute chest pain / MINOCA as well as cardiac CT for planning of interventional valve therapy. He is a registered young scientist at the German Center for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK) and a member of the Young Club of the European Society of Cardiovascular Radiology.

Lecture 2 - details

Description

Valvular heart disease is an important public-health problem with an increasing prevalence along with ageing of the population. Thus, it is generally recognised the necessity for the use of the most accurate diagnostic tools in order to reveal this type of pathology. Echocardiography remains the imaging modality of choice for the diagnosis and management of patients with valvular heart disease.
Cardiac Magnetic Resonance, as an advanced and sophisticated imaging technique, could play an additional role for the assessment of the severity of the disease, providing pathophysiologic and prognostic information, in order to better recognise early signs of ventricular dysfunction that may help to select people that could benefit from earlier therapeutic strategies and have better clinical outcome.

Learning Objectives

• To show the additional diagnostic value of CMR in valvular heart disease with dedicated protocols and sequences.
• To reveal the prognostic value of CMR and its role to the prediction of patients clinical outcome.
• To mention the role of newer MRI techniques (mapping, strain) in early detection of LV structural and functional changes that may help to identify patients who may benefit from early surgery

 

Teaser



Do you identify these valvular disorders? In which syndrome they occur?

About the speaker

Dr. Alexandros Kallifatidis is a Radiologist with subspecialty in Cardiovascular Imaging and a leading person in Cardiac Imaging (Cardiac CT, Cardiac MRI) in Greece. He is a Board Certified Cardiovascular Imaging Radiologist (European Board of Cardiovascular Radiology-EBCR) and an active subcommittee member of “Education & EBCR Committee” of ESCR.

After finishing his residency in Thessaloniki he was trained in Cardiac Imaging in Heidelberg-Germany
(Cardiology Department, University Hospital “Medizinische Klinik”-Prof.Katus- Prof.Korosoglou))
as well as in Marseille-France (Radiology Department, University Hospital “LA TIMONE”-Prof.Bartoli-Prof. Jacquier).
Since 2007 he is working in the Radiology Department of St.Luke’s Hospital in Thessaloniki, one of the
largest private hospitals in Greece.

Under his supervision the Diagnostic Cardiac Section became one of the leading and well known units in
Greece, performing many of the latest imaging techniques in Cardiac Radiology, such as CMR Stress-perfussion,
CMR Mapping techniques, CMR Strain etc. in daily clinical practice.

In addition, he is collaborating for research purpose with well known Greek and European
Radiology and Cardiology Departments, especially in the field of pulmonary hypertension, of cardiomyopathies and and coronary artery disease.

He is an active speaker in Greece and Europe and he is organising Scientific Courses in Greece,
with guests Lecturers real experts and pioneers in the field of Cardiovascular Imaging.
Since 2015 he is collaborating in clinical practice with the Radiology Department of University Hospital “CHU-Hôpital Nord” in St.Etienne-France (Prof.Croisille)

He is an elected Executive Committee Member of the Radiological Society of Northern Greece and an elected Educational Committee Member of the Hellenic Radiological Society.

Webinar recordings

Please note that only active ESCR members, having balanced their membership fee for the current year, will be able to watch the recordings. In order to access the recordings, kindly click on the button below. In case you are not an active member of ESCR, renew your membership here.

ESOR (European School of Radiology)

ESCR is happy to announce its collaboration with the European School of Radiology (ESOR) – an institution, fulfilling the mission of the European Society of Radiology (ESR) in the field of education. One of its main goals is to assist in harmonising radiological education in Europe. With its wide range of activities ESOR additionally aims to raise standards in the field of scientific radiology, to extend and coordinate teaching resources worldwide and to help young radiologists to achieve the knowledge and skills to fulfil tomorrow’s requirements.

For more information about ESOR activities, please visit the official website.

CARDIOVASCULAR SCHOLARSHIP

Application for 2019

February 25th – March 11th, 2019

More information

For more information on how to apply, please visit the ESOR website.

Aim

The ESOR Visiting Scholarship Programme (Europe) offers qualified trainees the opportunity to get to know another training environment and to kick off an interest for subspecialisation in radiology. During three months of training the scholars will be provided with a structured, modular introduction to different subspecialties and will be supervised by a specialised tutor in a pre-selected, highly esteemed academic training centre in Europe.

Number of available scholarships

During 2019, up to 36 scholarships are available on different topics and will be realised in partnership with Bracco and ESR. One additional scholarship for Spanish residents in partnership with the Spanish Foundation of Radiology and three scholarships for Greek residents supported by the Hellenic Radiological Society will be offered. Furthermore, two of the available scholarships will be provided for residents from Georgia within the ESR Support Initiative.

Eligibility

1. These scholarships apply to residents in their 3rd, 4th or 5th year of training in radiology who desire to get the benefit of a mentored modular training of a specific subspecialised topic in radiology.
2. Completion of the training curriculum from at least the first two years of residency is required, verified by the head of the department. Competence in producing a radiological report and communicating with clinicians and patients is appreciated, as well as knowledge of the principles of administration and management applied to a clinical department with multi-disciplinary staff and high-cost equipment.
3. Previous exposure in any field of special interest, including basic knowledge of imaging methods, indications for imaging and clinical expectations, is advantageous.
4. Applicants must be proficient in English.
5. ESR membership fees for 2019 must be settled.

Applicants who were selected for this programme or the Visiting Scholarship Programme USA in the past cannot be considered again.

Duration of scholarships and funding

The training will start in the second half of the year and last for three months. The scholar will receive a grant (€3.500,-) upon completion of the training, delivery of a final report and submission of original flight tickets and accommodation receipts. The grant is intended to contribute in part to travel and accommodation expenses during the training period. ESOR cannot guarantee that the grant will cover these costs in full. During the period of the training the scholar is responsible for covering his/her expenses and his/her own health insurance. The training itself is offered for free. Please note that in particular cases administrative charges may arise, which are to be covered by the grant.

Programme structure

The programme offers a structured modular training in a highly esteemed training centre. The trainee will have the opportunity to follow and participate in the core knowledge training programme through tutorials and lectures, followed by hands-on teaching on routine clinical cases and/or modality techniques and protocols, led by an assigned tutor.

In non-native English speaking training centres teaching would be in English, while major radiological conferences and reporting may be in the local language. Some knowledge of the local language may be an advantage.

The trainee will be able to observe clinical activities, but will not have direct patient care responsibilities.

It is the trainee’s responsibility to communicate with the centre regarding the details of the training and whether more responsibilities than observer status can be obtained. ESOR solely acts as facilitator and coordinator between the training centre and the trainee.

Certification

After completion of the training programme, the resident receives a certificate from ESR/ESOR. In order to receive this, the scholar must present a written report about his/her work and activities during the programme.

CARDIOVASCULAR FELLOWSHIP

Application for 2019

February 25th – March 11th, 2019

More information

For more information on how to apply, please visit the ESOR website.

Aim

Recent advances in CT and MR technology and clinical research have rapidly expanded the range of applications of these imaging modalities, particularly in imaging of the heart.

The need to sufficiently qualify further young radiologists to render confident diagnosis in cardiovascular radiology using multi-detector CT and MRI studies, led the European Society of Radiology (ESR) and the European Society of Cardiovascular Radiology (ESCR) to take the initiative in establishing an exchange programme for fellowships or subspecialisation training in cardiovascular radiology.

It offers an opportunity to complement subspecialisation training in cardiovascular radiology or an existing structured fellowship programme, through exchange, in this field of radiology. Through three months of training the trainee will be provided with intense modular training in cardiovascular radiology and will be supervised by a specialised tutor in a pre-selected, highly esteemed, academic training centre in Europe.

Number of available places

During 2019, two places will be offered and organised through ESOR and the successful applicant will receive a grant jointly provided by ESR/ESOR and ESCR.

Eligibility

1. The programme applies to radiologists within the first three years after certification, who desire to become subspecialist radiologists.
2. Basic knowledge of current clinical practice in radiology with regard to CT and MRI. Competence in producing a radiological report, in communication with clinicians and patients, and knowledge of the principles of administration and management applied to a clinical department with multi-disciplinary staff and high-cost equipment is essential. Understanding the medicolegal implications of uncertainty and errors in diagnostic radiology is necessary. A clinical background in other disciplines, which has been achieved through clinical experience and training prior to entering the fellowship. Clinical experience in cardiology, angiology or cardiovascular surgery is advantageous.
3. Applicants must be proficient in English.
4. ESR and ESCR membership fees for 2019 must be settled.

Applicants who were selected for this programme in the past cannot be considered for a second time.

Duration and funding

The training will start in the second half of the year and last for three months. The fellow will receive a grant (€3.500,-) upon completion of the training, delivery of a final report and submission of original flight tickets and accommodation receipts. The grant is intended to contribute in part to travel and accommodation expenses during the training period. ESOR cannot guarantee that the grant will cover these costs in full. During the period of the training the fellow is responsible for covering his/her expenses and his/her own health insurance. The training itself is offered for free. Please note that in particular cases administrative charges may arise, which are to be covered by the grant.

Programme structure

Based on weekly training programme modules, the trainee will familiarise him/herself with the institution’s imaging equipment. He/She will then learn data handling and post-processing at different workstations, followed by case-by-case hands-on teaching on routine clinical cases with different modalities offered by an experienced staff.

With reviewing at least 100 cardiac cases that require CT and/or MRI evaluation at the end of the training programme, the trainee should be fluent in discussing the appropriate imaging modality and imaging technique with referring clinicians and be able to interpret different cardiac examinations on his/her own.

In non-native English speaking training centres teaching would be in English, while major radiological conferences and reporting may be in the local language. Some knowledge of the local language may be an advantage.

The trainee will be able to observe clinical activities, but will not have direct patient care responsibilities.

It is the trainee’s responsibility to communicate with the centre regarding the details of the training and whether more responsibilities than observer status can be obtained. ESOR solely acts as facilitator and coordinator between the training centre and the trainee.

Certification

After successful completion of the three-month training the trainees receive a certificate from ESR/ESOR and ESCR. In order to receive this, the fellow must present a written report about his/her work and activities during the programme.

JOURNALS

The International Journal of Cardiovascular Imaging (iJCVI)

 

The journal can be ordered with your Membership application or Membership payment.

Reduced price for ESCR members: 50€ (online version)

EUROPEAN RADIOLOGY

 

The flagship journal of the European Society of Radiology (ESR) continuously updates scientific knowledge in clinical radiology by publishing original research articles of general interest and importance as well as state-of-the-art reviews, and short communications written by leading radiologists.

Members of the ESR receive free electronic access to the journal, which is Europe’s No.1 journal for general radiology.

More information at www.european-radiology.org

 

INSIGHTS INTO IMAGING

 

This online gold open access journal specialises on critical reviews, guidelines and policy statements, and is dedicated to education and strategies in radiology.

Article Processing Charges for publication in Insights into Imaging are covered for all corresponding authors who are active members of the ESR.

More information at www.i3-journal.org

 

EUROPEAN RADIOLOGY EXPERIMENTAL

 

The youngest member of the ESR journal family concentrates on basic scientific discoveries, novel approaches and techniques in experimental settings in the field of medical imaging. It is an online gold open access journal.

Article Processing Charges for publication in European Radiology Experimental are covered for all corresponding authors who are active members of the ESR.

More information at www.er-x.org